The pet can be torpid after surgery and sleep for a while. Sleeping patients should have a blanket over them to keep their body temperature suitable. You can feel the body temperature from the paws, and make sure that they are not cold. If your pet feels cold, you can put a water bottle of warm water under the blanket next to the pet. Give food only when your pet is completely awake. Water can be offered earlier, when the pet itself wants to drink.

If the pet has a surgery wound it is important that it is not able to lick it or scratch the stitches. In the beginning we use an e-collar or protective dress to prevent your pet from touching the wound. The collar should stay on for 1-2 weeks.

If the wound has a bandage, take it away 1-2 days after surgery. Take care that the wound area stays clean, and protect it when needed from dirt and debris. If the wound area is wet or dirty wash it only with clean water and dry with a clean cloth lightly and carefully.

Recovery time is about two weeks, when the wound area is completely healed. The wound must be completely dry, so that it doesn’t bother the pet. If the wound is red, if it feels damp, or if the stitches have opened contact the veternarian as soon as possible.

There are two types of stitches self melting and unmelting. These stitches are removed at normally 8-12 days after surgery. Unmelting stitches are removed during the wound control visit in the clinic. Self melting stitches should be monitored.  If they are still seen two weeks after surgery, remove them carefully or visit the vet to remove them. The surgery visit will always mention what kind of stitches were used.

Cats do not usually  notice the wound, but if the cat licks the wound area continuously, contact the veternarian.

If the cat has a dressing, it can stay on for 3-5 days, sometimes the the cat rips the dress itself away earlier. If the wound and gauze below the (net) dress are wet, change it to a clean and dry wound gauze. The stitches are normally self melting.

Keep the e-collar on your dog for two weeks time after surgery. Jumping and cavorting can be resumed 2-3 weeks after. The stitches may be self melting or unmelting.

NOTE! WITH ENDOSCOPICALLY DONE SURGERIES THE RECOVERY TIME IS SHORTER.

Your pet can be already awake, waking or sleeping. If your pet is still asleep, take care that it keeps its body temperature up and put a blanket around it. With awakening can come restlessness and vomiting. Your pet may seem like its in pain, but it has received powerful pain medication that can last up to 12 hours after surgery.

If your pet has a large surgery wound in its lower abdamon, remember to support its backend every time you pick them up so the wound won’t tear. You can give food and water to your pet once it’s fully awake.

Bleeding:
Sometimes bleeding can present the first night after surgery. The wound area can accrue blood and fluid which can leak from the wound of the pet. Bleeding can be abundant but not dangerous if the gums of the pet do not turn white.

The wound area can be as needed applied a pressure bandage for the night, for example a clean hand towel and supporting gauze and placement ontop of the wound can be ideal use. The ideal placement goes around the pet so that the fold remains on the wound.

Wound care:
Wounds don’t normally need extra care, when checked. The wound area must be however kept clean. If the wound area is dirty or bleeding much, clean it away lightly and put a clean gauze bandage. You can use water to clean as needed. If the wound is leaking much fluid, you can wash it away with water.

To prevent infection in pets, the pet SHOULD NOT be able to lick, rub or scratch the wound area. If a pet is believed to want to lick the wound, they should always wear a e collar when not under supervision.

Exercise:
The pet needs to be able to go out when needed. When outdoors, make sure that the wound does not get dirty. Normally in soft tissue surgerys including utreus sterilsation surgeries the recovery time is two weeks.

NOTE! These home care instructions are general, and do not cover all patients. Check always with your veteranian your own pets home care instructions.